Reader Interactions

Comments

    • LauraJ says

      Thank you!! I think the topic in general is really interesting and so it was easy for me to write down my opinions.

  1. hoiyinli says

    Great read as always and the real conversation that we need today. I used to buy lots of magazines with my own pocket money from the age of 11. I was just happy spending it on magazines and sometimes, the more the merrier as I got a bit older. I really don’t know what the fascination was but I loved it! Part of me wants to say that it was like my sister (I have no sisters) because it talked about embarrassing issues that I would never have talked about with my friends especially at the forefront of puberty. But speaking of ‘issues’, it also talked about some issues that, in the grand scheme of things, are actually not issues but just clichés and the result of overthinking. There are no real problems in a lot of women’s magazines that are discussed, and by that I mean current affairs and politics. Of course, weight, image, our sex lives etc. etc. can be a problem but a lot of those things are pecking at our own insecurities because women are really insecure…right?! It’s almost amazing how insecurity sells. I guess in a way I gave up on women’s magazines as soon as I realised the stories were just getting tasteless at a time when there was so much more on the internet or just by turning on the news channel for once.

    • LauraJ says

      I think women’s marketing is all about insecurities. I have noticed that when I watch an advert aimed at men, it is usually about humour or trying to relate to them.
      But with women, it is about picking out what they were not even worrying about and then telling them that they should worry.

      I used to have such a fascination as well. As a kid I used to read Mizz magazine and I couldn’t wait until I was old enough to read the women’s one’s. And I had such insecurity. I think I would buy them and hope that they could somehow turn me into the glamorous cover stars or a woman who has it all together.

      Thank you for writing such an in-depth reply. It was great to read.

  2. J | thenellybean says

    Another wonderful read from you, Laura. I’ve always felt that way about women’s magazines – I used to lurk by the stand at Tesco’s whilst my parents did the shopping, wondering if this was what I was supposed to aspire to as a female. It’s a strange one, perhaps the rise of influencers is a great thing. Inspiring a whole generation to relate to a real person who shows us relatable segments of their daily lives in vlogs and blog posts. Love it xx

    • LauraJ says

      Thank you!
      With most if not all women’s magazines, there is a stereotypical woman that we are suppose to aspire to. And the readers are also stereotypical and they usually address them as women who are insecure, celebrity obsessed and working in an office they hate.
      There are two sides to influencers and the good is that there are now more relatable topics. But also, I think the elitism and the idea of rich kids taking the top spots has slightly diminished. Now it’s at a better level playing field. xx

  3. hudapervez says

    Great read, the part that really got me was where you mentioned how people spend years crafting their skills can be overtaken in seconds by someone who did something shocking on YouTube and that is such a sad but true aspect of social media today! xx

    • LauraJ says

      Thank you! I think social-media has affected creative careers a lot. People see how fun it looks online, when in reality anything creative is tough and competitive. And social-media has added to the competitiveness of it all. xx

    • LauraJ says

      It is really hard – I agree with you. I actually have a friend who was working on big tv campaigns and flying overseas to do film work in makeup. I assumed that she was earning a lot and doing really well, but she was actually struggling.
      I think the problem with creative industries is the pay. Many companies know that you want their name on your CV so they make you work for free. That happens especially in fashion. And now there is the social-media and YouTube competition.
      Being a makeup artist is super tough and I think online it might look easy. In my opinion you made a good choice by going down another route. I would only say to do it if you are 1000% sure that it is what you want.

I would love to read your thoughts!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: